Multi-vendor interoperability for smart home devices on the increase

ULE Alliance reports from the Broadband World Forum that more and more companies are starting to allow their customers to implement products from other companies into their networks

Multi-vendor interoperability for smart home devices on the increase

Amongst the latest trends that stood out at the recent Broadband World Forum event in London were multi-vendor interoperability and voice control for Smart Homes. More and more companies are starting to allow their customers to implement products from other companies into their networks, the ULE Alliance and DECT Forum reported.

At the stand of the ULE Alliance and the DECT Forum, visitors could witness how Smart Home products from different manufacturers can now easily be connected with each other.

“Our interoperability demo with devices from different vendors attracted a lot of attention,” said Ruth Wilson from the ULE Alliance. “End users are looking for easy-to-use and secure solutions, which are not limited to the product range of a single company, and that’s exactly what certified ULE devices offer.

“As ULE is based on DECT, the standard is not only secure, but also allows end users to control their smart home with their voice,” Wilson explained. “Unlike other solutions for voice enabled devices, for example the Nest thermostat, ULE does not require any additional external hardware to implement voice control. A single low-cost ULE chip does all the work.”

Voice transmission is a natural part of ULE, as it inherits its capabilities from the traditional DECT technology , which is predominantly used for voice communication. DECT radio technology is already in use in 100s of millions of products worldwide such as in cordless telephones.

Sensors and control devices which use the ULE technology can deliver two-way, high definition voice communication, in addition to data. As a result, ULE-based products like smoke detectors do not only sound an alarm in case of an emergency, but also inform the user where in the house the smoke has been detected.

Depending on the solution, even the implementation of real-time communication via a microphone is possible, for example to communicate with a remote location such as an emergency call centre or a fire station.

By giving companies and organisations like the ULE Alliance a platform to showcase their latest innovations, the Broadband World Forum remains one of the key events of the industry after its move from Amsterdam to London. What has changed over the years, however, is that “broadband” no longer only refers to telephony and the Internet, but also to other areas like the Smart Home, the ULE Alliance noted.

Broadband World Forum was held at the ExCel London exhibition centre on 20-22 October 2015 and attracted 8,000 senior executives from across the world. Over 130 exhibitors demonstrated their latest innovations, including IoT and Smart Home solutions. Over 300 cross-industry speakers and 35 conference sessions provided insight into the industry.

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